Viagra

18 Sep: You know about “little blue pill”. What about “pink Viagra” for women?

Erectile Dysfunction drugs such as Viagra, Cialis, and Levitra have made huge strides in treating male sexual dysfunction but have women been left behind? At this writing (September 2009), no treatment has been approved by the FDA for Female Sexual Dysfunctions (FSD), which are estimated by the Journal of the American Medical Association to affect 43% of American women (about 40 million) at some point in their lives. It’s not for lack of trying. Pharmaceutical makers would love to tap into a market that’s the other 50% of the population. They are assertively researching the problem. So why has a result not come forward? One issue is that, with men, sexual dysfunction, no matter whether the cause is mental or…

12 Jun: If pills haven’t fixed your ED, it is time to consider alternatives

Millions of dollars in direct-to-consumer advertising by big pharmaceutical companies have ensured that most Americans are familiar with the “Little Blue Pill” — Viagra — as well as with competing products Cialis and Levitra. These drugs, called phosphodiesterase inhibitors, enhance the effects of nitric oxide, a chemical that relaxes muscles in the penis. This increases blood flow to enable an erection to occur with proper stimulation. There are differences among the three medications, but they are relatively minor. Viagra came on the scene first, so it’s helped more people and has a longer track record. Levitra begins working the fastest, and Cialis lasts the longest — up to 36 hours, compared to four for Viagra. Often, a doctor might prescribe…