rogue internet pharmacies

15 Sep: Where does teen prescription drug abuse start? Parents’ Med cabinet

The Los Angeles Times reports on the growing problem of teen prescription drug abuse in today’s editions. Although the problem has been tied by some to the rise of Internet pharmacies, research shows that fewer than five percent of teen prescription drug abusers buy drugs from strangers (a category that includes online pharmacies). Most young abusers start in their parents’ medicine cabinet. An excerpt from the story: Among teens and young adults 12 to 25, one-third of those who use illicit drugs say they recently have abused prescription drugs — including painkillers, tranquilizers and stimulants. Among kids 12 to 17, 3.3% had abused prescription psychotherapeutic drugs in the last month. Among 17- to 25-year-olds, 6% had abused prescription drugs in…

Rogue Online Pharmacies - LegitScripts.com

05 Sep: Are All Canadian Pharmacies “Rogue” Online Pharmacies? LegitScript Thinks So.

While reading Benjamin Gluck’s Internet Pharmacy Law blog, I came across a reference to an “Internet pharmacy verification and information service” I hadn’t yet heard of: LegitScript. I like the professed mission of LegitScript: to improve online pharmacy safety by offering a database that allows consumers to enter a pharmacy’s name and find out whether it’s legitimate or not. LegitScript apparently intends to make money by providing a verification seal to online pharmacies that meet its standards. I say “apparently” because LegitScript verification is currently provided free of charge. All of which sounds fine — until you look a little closer. You see, LegitScript claims ALL Canadian pharmacies are unsafe. Even the most established, reputable pharmacies — licensed and inspected…

08 Aug: 70 illegal Internet pharmacy Web sites shut down in sting

Medical Web Services, an Internet pharmacy operation that ran 70 illegal internet pharmacy Web sites, was busted this week in Cedar Rapids, Iowa — and the feds are seeking $41 million in proceeds from the alleged rogue internet pharmacy operation. What were these Web sites doing illegally? Allegedly, they were distributing Schedule III and Schedule IV substances via online questionnaires. According to the indictment, which named six participants in the operation: Internet customers logged onto one of the domain names owned, operated, hosted, or linked to Medical Web Services and placed orders for prescription drugs. The customers completed a short health history questionnaire and provided credit card payment information. The customers’ identities were not verified, nor were customers required to…