prescription drug abuse

Can America Health Thyself? Cover

03 Feb: Can America Health Thyself? [Infographic]

Americans who do not practice or affiliate with any religion is growing—and rapidly. At the same time, Americans are more medicated than ever before and it doesn’t seem to be slowing down. Normal and prescribed drug use is ok and can help people with afflictions in many ways. However, substance abuse is on the rise. Clergy are taking note at America’s need to depend on Christ for healing and research has shown that those who regularly attend religious services are much more inclined to use prescription drugs safely, as they were intended to be used. The cost of substance abuse is astronomical. The cost in crime, illness, deaths, and medical costs should be enough to scare anyone sober. For those…

eDrugSearch.com's 14 Most Popular Posts From 2014

09 Jan: eDrugSearch.com’s 14 Most Popular Posts From 2014

  Aren’t you just a little bit curious to see what articles and infographics were the most popular in 2014? Here’s the countdown: 14.) What Everybody Ought to Know About Heartburn Medications – Learn about the upside to taking heartburn medications, downsides and risks, proper diagnosis, and how to find the best price on your medications. 13.) 17 Common Prescription Drugs with Bad Side Effects – Let’s take a look at a few of these prescription drugs with bad side effects, what those side effects are, and what you can do if you experience any of them. 12.) Pay LESS than Your $10 Co-pay for Many Generic Medications! – If your monthly co-pay is $10, then that seems reasonable. But what if you can get your generic medications…

Prescription and OTC Drug Abuse – The New Epidemic

31 Dec: Prescription and OTC Drug Abuse – The New Epidemic

The emerging and insidious epidemic Americans should be worried about is not Ebola; it is prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drug abuse and it’s running rampant throughout the U.S. It is something that we all wish wasn’t a reality, but unfortunately it is and we can’t turn a blind eye. Prescription drug abuse is defined by the NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse as taking any medication is a way other than the way the doctor has prescribed. The NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse also states that prescription and OTC drugs are the most sought after drugs after alcohol and marijuana by Americans aged 14 and older. This abuse includes taking medication that has been prescribed for someone else, taking…

Celebrity Drug Overdoses

03 Jul: Celebrity Drug Overdoses [Infographic]

Celebrities Who Have Died from Drug Overdoses Prescription drug abuse is a serious and growing problem in America. Prescription drugs are easy to get addicted to and terribly hard to get over. In the United States, almost 290 people overdose on prescription drugs everyday. A drug overdose doesn’t always result in death, but it can still cause serious health problems and eventually lead you to your deathbed. These celebrity overdoses, whether accidental or not, is a serious problem that needs to be addressed. Below is a list of celebrities who have died from drug overdoses. The infographic below shows just a few of those whose lives have ended early due to a prescription drug overdose. Also check out: 12 Accidental…

02 Jul: The pharmacy that sold Michael Jackson $48K worth of drugs per month

Reports have surfaced that pop superstar Michael Jackson was spending as much as $48,000 per month on prescription drugs, including Demerol and Diprivan. A sidelight of this story is the pharmacy that news reports say filled and delivered many of those orders: Mickey Fine Pharmacy & Grill in Beverly Hills. Mickey Fine is a pretty snazzy-looking place. It was originally one of those legendary Schwab Pharmacies where starlets were discovered while drinking milkshakes. As recently as March, it was a featured location in the Starz comedy series “Head Case.” It’s not the kind of place you would normally associate with supplying a prescription drug habit. Let me be clear: there is absolutely no evidence that Mickey Fine has done anything…

24 Sep: Teen cheerleader busted for selling prescription drugs from her BMW

What could be more symbolic of the growing problem of prescription drug abuse among teenagers than this: a blond-haired, blue-eyed, 16-year-old cheerleader from a Christian high school selling Xanax, hydrocodone, Oxycontin, Demerol, and Percocet to fellow students from the comfort of the BMW her parents bought her? The girl’s name is Hunter Ashton Johnson. If police allegations are true, it will be interesting to find out where she got her supply; often, it’s from the parents’ medicine cabinet. Full story here and here.

17 Sep: Pharmacist teaches students the perils of prescription-drug abuse

The Cleveland Plain Dealer posted an article Tuesday night about the longstanding — and arguably worsening — problem of prescription drug abuse among health professionals. The part of the story I found most compelling was the section on D. Christopher Hart, a disgraced pharmacist who has worked hard to redeem himself by educating others. His story: Hart, 54, lost his Ohio pharmacy license in December 2004, after being caught a second time taking Vicodin from pharmacies where he worked. The first time, in the early ’90s, his license was suspended. He went through treatment and five years of drug testing and AA meetings. The second time, his license was revoked. He had been stealing about 15 pills a day, which…

15 Sep: Where does teen prescription drug abuse start? Parents’ Med cabinet

The Los Angeles Times reports on the growing problem of teen prescription drug abuse in today’s editions. Although the problem has been tied by some to the rise of Internet pharmacies, research shows that fewer than five percent of teen prescription drug abusers buy drugs from strangers (a category that includes online pharmacies). Most young abusers start in their parents’ medicine cabinet. An excerpt from the story: Among teens and young adults 12 to 25, one-third of those who use illicit drugs say they recently have abused prescription drugs — including painkillers, tranquilizers and stimulants. Among kids 12 to 17, 3.3% had abused prescription psychotherapeutic drugs in the last month. Among 17- to 25-year-olds, 6% had abused prescription drugs in…

20 Aug: Survey: Teens who abuse prescription drugs don’t buy them online

The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University (CASA), last week issued a fascinating survey of teens. Two results stood out to me: 1. Teens (aged 12 to 17) indicated, for the first time, that it is easier to acquire “prescription drugs such as OxyContin, Percocet, Vicodin or Ritalin, without a prescription” than it is to buy beer. 2. While Internet pharmacies have been widely blamed for the increase in prescription drug abuse, few of the teens surveyed say that the drug abusers acquire their drugs from online pharmacies. That’s right. Here’s what CASA’s press release says: When teens who know prescription drug abusers were asked where those kids get their drugs: 31 percent said from friends…

31 Jul: Four ways to keep your teen from abusing prescription medications

  The Indianapolis Star has a valuable article providing tips to parents who are worried about their teenage children abusing prescription medications. The article’s four tips: Monitor the prescriptions you have in your home. Secure your medicines. Dispose of old prescriptions. Communicate and set a good example for your child. It’s nice to see a reasonable — and actually useful — article on this issue, rather than the hysterical attacks on licensed Canadian pharmacies that this topic often inspires. Read the full article here. Also, check out Not in My House, a Web site from the Partnership for a Drug-Free America.

23 Jul: Florida Times-Union credits eDrugSearch.com in editorial

The Florida Times-Union, the newspaper of Jacksonville, FL, published an editorial today headlined, “Internet Pharmacies: A prescription for death.” We’re not crazy about that headline, as you might imagine. We’ve worked very hard to get the news media to distinguish legitimate, licensed Canadian pharmacies from dangerous, rogue online pharmacies in their coverage. But you know how it is. In any case, we were pleased that the Times-Union’s editorial used one of our blog posts to illustrate the seriousness of the problem of prescription drug abuse. The relevant excerpt: Most people know that Elvis Presley and Marilyn Monroe both died from an overdose of prescription drugs. Judy Garland also succumbed to a prescription drug overdose – as did Howard Hughes and…

29 Jun: Woman arrested for filling 200 fake prescriptions

  With all the talk of the dangers of online and mail-order pharmacies in the media these days, it’s important to remind ourselves that when people are determined to do the wrong thing, they’ll do it with or without the Internet’s help. I came across a great example of this in the news the other day, where in Prichard, Alabama, police arrested a man and woman for running a drug ring selling prescription drugs illegally. How did the woman — Angela Hurst, 28 — build her supply? By ordering them from a rogue pharmacy online? Nope. Here’s the story (italics mine): Narcotics officers say Hurst called in at least 200 hundred fake prescriptions to area drug stores. Hurst was allowed…

09 Jun: To end prescription drug abuse, we must take on “doctor shopping”

Obviously, a lot has been said and written linking Internet pharmacies to prescription drug abuse. But prescription drug abuse occurs every day without the Internet being involved at all. In most cases, in fact, abusers are prescribed their meds by a doctor and pick them up at the corner pharmacy. How does this happen? Shouldn’t physicians know when they’ve overprescribed a potentially dangerous drug to a patient? Yes, an individual doctor should know. But most prescription drug abusers don’t just go to one doctor. They go to several. It’s called “doctor shopping.” Actor Heath Ledger didn’t die from ordering drugs over the Internet. He died because he ordered too many drugs from too many different doctors. No one doctor would…

27 May: Sorry, Haze fans: You won’t find any Nectar here

  With the release of the much-anticipated game Haze for Playstation 3, know-it-all commentators have a new, ready-made scapegoat for the upsurge in teen prescription drug abuse. That’s right — now they can blame video games! Specifically, they can blame Haze, the plot of which is described as follows: The game revolves around Mantel Global Industries, a multinational corporation with bio-medical expertise. This has led to the development of Nova-Keto-Thyrazine – also called Nectar … a performance-enhancing pharmaceutical drug that grants the user enhanced speed, accuracy and strength. Mantel uses this drug to control the minds of its soldiers. When administered, Nectar can control–among other things– what a soldier sees, similar to the effects of a hallucinogenic drug. It makes…

22 May: Don’t blame the Internet for prescription drug abuse

Yeah, I know; I’ve written about this topic before — more than a few times. But I feel compelled to do so again. Frankly, I’m mad as heck and I can’t take it any more. Just as there have been past hysterias blaming the Internet for sexual predators, pornography, political polarization, celebrity obsession, obesity (go outside and play!) and every other social malady facing our nation, now it seems the media is whipping itself into a frenzy over the dangers of Internet pharmacies for prescription drug abuse. The latest blog post I flagged on this topic, “Internet Pharmacy Websites the New Drug Dealers,” referenced a sad tale on CNN.com headlined, “My husband died from online drugs.” Don’t get me wrong….

26 Mar: Adderall and the seduction of Generation Rx

The big news this week is that super-celebs like Paris, Lindsay and Britney are all rumored to be using Adderall, the ADHD drug, for weight loss. Since these celebrities are among the stars most admired by teenage girls, I can only assume that this revelation will influence more young people to abuse this drug. The improper use of Adderall can cause heart problems, liver problems. Some people are allergic to it. And it can have dangerous interactions with other drugs. The Heath Ledger tragedy should tell us all we need to know about the risks of taking multiple drugs without fully understanding how they interact. Adderall is for ADHD. If you’re looking to lose weight, try diet and exercise —…

Celebrity Drug Overdoses

23 Jan: 12 Accidental Celebrity Prescription Drug Deaths

  Heath Ledger could be the latest star to have died from an accidental overdose of prescription drugs. Ledger was taking anti-depressants as well as the “dangerous drug” Ambien at the time of his death, although his autopsy today was inconclusive. While most celebrity overdoses have been the result of either suicide or the use of illegal drugs, a surprising number of stars have died by accident — from medications you can purchase at the corner pharmacy. Here’s a list of accidental celebrity drug deaths: 1.) MARILYN MONROE. Elton John’s “Candle in the Wind” died from an overdose of sleeping pills — specifically, Nembutal and chloral hydrate . Although Monroe’s death was officially listed as a suicide in 1962, many forensic…

10 Dec: Katie Couric on prescription drug abuse by teens

Here’s an informative interview of Steve Pasierb of the Partnership for a Drug-Free America by Katie Couric on the topic of teen prescription drug abuse. Among the startling statistics, Pasierb says 20 percent of U.S. teenagers admit to abusing prescription drugs. He adds that only one-third of parents communicate the dangers of prescription drug abuse to their children.

23 Aug: Hydrocodone supplants OxyContin as the new “hillbilly heroin”

A few years ago, OxyContin was all over the news because of Rush Limbaugh’s much-publicized addiction — and also because its illicit use was so widespread in Appalachia that it was known as “hillbilly heroin.” We’re not sure about Rush, but apparently the hillibillies have moved on — to hydrocodone. According to the AP: As OxyContin came under scrutiny, doctors were more careful about how they prescribed it. Many switched to hydrocodone products, which were already popular but didn’t have the same stigma. All 50 states saw increases in the distribution of hydrocodone between 2001 and 2005. But the trend was particularly significant in the South, where all of the top 10 states in terms of increased distribution are located,…

23 Jul: Why are so many boys on Ritalin?

Here’s a fascinating — and troubling — read from Glenn Sacks: According to the Washington Post, 10% percent of 10-year-old American boys are on Ritalin or similar drugs. From my experience as a teacher I can tell you that there are some kids for whom the drugs are useful–I’ve seen it firsthand. On the other hand, for most boys it is useless and counterproductive… The problem is not our boys–the problem is that our schools refuse to adapt and accommodate boys’ educational needs and learning styles … This can be seen from the time boys enter school, when many of them are immediately branded as behavior problems. The line of 10 kids who had to gather every day after school…

20 Jul: Adderall, Ritalin among prescription drugs abused by college students

College kids are abusing prescription drugs more than ever before, and clearly shady Internet dealers are part of the problem. From UWire: According to a Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse report, the percentage of college students abusing prescription drugs has increased dramatically over the past two decades … Heidi Cuda, the regional director for Iowa City, Iowa’s Mid-Eastern Council on Chemical Abuse, named Adderall and Ritalin as two prescription drugs commonly abused by students. The number of students taking these ADHD medications has increased 93 percent from 1993 to 2005… “They are stimulants; they give you confidence and make you more alert,” she said. “People take them to stay up longer, but they usually crash, bringing their energy level…

15 Feb: More teenagers are abusing prescription drugs

From the NY Daily News: Junior’s been helping himself to Mother’s little helper. That’s the conclusion of a report released Wednesday by White House drug czar John Walters that found while teenagers’ use of marijuana is declining, their abuse of prescription drugs is holding steady or in some cases increasing. “The drug dealer is us,” said Walters, the national drug policy director, who released the report Wednesday at a news conference in New York. “We have to have a response that keeps that very important fact in mind.” Teens who are being treated for prescription drug addiction agreed. “It’s available and you can get high off of it,” said Michael Robin, a 17-year-old who is being treated for addiction to…