GlaxoSmithKline

24 Oct: Buy Tamiflu and Relenza online to rescue you against the swine flu

As the 2009/2010 influenza season progresses, there is cause for worry. Flu activity is already widespread in 46 states, according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), and the 2009 novel H1N1 flu virus, popularly known as the “swine flu,” is on the rise. Meanwhile, the swine flu vaccine is difficult to obtain, leaving many unprotected from this new strain. Fortunately, the antiviral treatments Tamiflu and Relenza are still largely effective against the swine flu. Why is there so much worry about pandemic flu this year? Regular flu kills 36,000 people in the US each year, but the swine flu variation has the potential to kill many more. The latest update from the CDC shows that swine flu has caused…

25 Sep: The Fosamax mistrial, and other options in osteoporosis medication

Earlier this month, a closely-watched trial over the osteoporosis drug Fosamax ended in mistrial, to the frustration of nearly everyone involved. The trial was marked by great tension, with a deadlocked jury, reports of threats of physical violence, and a judge-ordered cooling-down period. What could cause such intense drama? Well, this was just one of approximately 900 state and federal cases pending against Fosamax, alleging that that medication causes osteonecrosis of the jaw (the death of jawbone tissue). In large part, the tension in the Manhattan courtroom was that this trial “the first” was supposed to be an indicator of how these hundreds of similar cases might proceed. The other major factor is that it is notoriously difficult to “prove”…

20 May: Audio of Glaxo CEO meltdown

GlaxoSmithKline CEO JP Garnier is grilled relentlessly by a BCC radio reporter about the suppression of data that suggested the anti-depressant Paxil (Seroxat in the U.K.) increased the likelihood of teen suicides — and finally walks out of the interview. Here’s the 10-minute clip; the meltdown starts at about the seven-minute mark: More on the interview from Furious Seasons. More on Garnier here.

30 Oct: Avandia one vote away from elimination

Sen. Charles Grassley, the ranking Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, says that the FDA’s Drug Safety Oversight Board voted 8-7 on Oct. 2 to keep the scandal-plagued diabetes drug Avandia on the market. The result was kept from the public. Wow, what a nailbiter. That’s enough to give Glaxo execs a heart attack (or at least increase the risk of one by, oh, 43 percent.) (Via Reuters.)

15 Aug: Avandia gets black-boxed

From HealthDay News: The widely used but controversial diabetes drug Avandia will now have a strong “black box” warning on its label, advising users of an increased risk of heart failure, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced late Tuesday. Another four diabetes drugs from the same class, including Actos, will also carry a similar black-box message, which is the agency’s strongest label warning. The FDA and the drug manufacturers, GlaxoSmithKline and Takeda Pharmaceuticals, have been negotiating the label changes since May. Studies have suggested that Avandia (rosiglitazone), made by Glaxo, and Actos (pioglitazone), made by Takeda, raise patients’ odds for heart failure. Other research has suggested that Avandia might possibly raise users’ risk for heart attack, though the FDA…

25 Jul: Avandia’s latest side effect: $200 million in lost revenues for Glaxo

Glaxo pulled a rabbit out of the hat in its earnings report today with a little misdirection. Per MarketWatch: GlaxoSmithKline on Wednesday took some of the attention away from disappointing sales of diabetes drugs by announcing it was lifting its stock buyback authorization to 12 billion pounds ($24.7 billion). Experts expected to see Glaxo report a $200 million revenue plunge in sales of Avandia, its diabetes medicine that’s been linked to an increased risk of heart attacks. According to The Times of London, analysts, on average, predicted that global sales of the drug during the three months to June 30 had fallen by 23 per cent to 367 million, compared to 477 million in 2006. (You can double those numbers…