drug safety tips

Is It Legal to Buy Prescription Drugs from Canada?

13 Jun: How to Buy Drugs Online Safely

Point, click and buy whatever you want or need. Whether you are looking for a good deal on airline tickets, need groceries, want a new car or the latest best-selling book, the Internet is the go-to resource. In recent years, the door has also opened to buy prescription drugs online. National pharmacy chains and health insurance providers offer options to make purchases without traveling to the drug store. Additionally, there are legitimate Internet sites that sell prescription drugs to online shoppers. There are also, however, a number of unlicensed sites that have tapped into this shopping convenience. Knowing how to buy drugs online safely… can save time and money when you are selective in the sites that you use. One…

How to Travel with Prescription Medication

21 May: How to Travel with Prescription Medication

Packing for a trip can be a daunting task – especially if prescription medications are on your list of travel essentials. Maybe you aren’t sure how much to bring or perhaps you have certain prescription medications that require refrigeration or other special accommodations. Not to worry! We’re going to show you how to travel with prescription medication with tips that will ensure both the safety and integrity of your medication during the trip as well as your peace of mind. Keep it close and keep it safe When packing for your trip and planning how to travel with prescription medication, leave enough room in your carry on bags. Having your medication close at hand will ensure that you are able…

How to Rate Your Medicine

01 May: How to Rate Your Medicine

Being able to quickly find and read reviews of the products that interest us is very important since reviews can truly influence the decisions we make. We all appreciate the reviewer who takes the time to post their straightforward, honest comments and ratings to help us make better choices. You can easily repay this favor by rating and reviewing the products you use so that others can benefit from your experience. Here at eDrugSearch.com, we give all our visitors the opportunity to not just read reviews of a great variety of medicines, but to easily post their own ratings and reviews themselves, helping our medication ratings and review database continue to grow. Learning how to rate your medicine is actually…

Medication Safety Tips for Kids

04 Apr: Medication Safety Tips for Kids

When childproofing their home, most parents know to keep medications out of their child’s reach. However, many accidental poisonings still occur every year despite parental precautions, and the majority of these emergency room visits are related to medications that a child got into when a parent or caregiver was not looking. Therefore, it is important for every parent to pay attention to these new tips regarding medication safety tips for kids so they can ensure their child is safe from the threat of an accidental poisoning. Store Medications Out of Sight For most children, out of sight does mean out of mind. Therefore, one of the best steps parents can take to prevent an accidental poisoning is to store all…

How to Properly Dispose of Medications

25 Mar: How to Properly Dispose of Medications

  The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) give guidelines on the proper disposal of medications. Before, consumers were advised to dispose of medications by flushing them down the toilet. This is no longer recommended. Here are tips on how to properly dispose of medications. Guidelines for proper disposal of prescription drugs Unless otherwise instructed in the package, put prescription drugs in sealed plastic bags and throw them in a trash. If possible, mix the pills with an unattractive substance such as coffee grounds. This will prevent pets and children from consuming the drugs in case they find them. Flush liquid medication down the toilet. However, do this only if it says…

Is It Legal to Buy Prescription Drugs from Canada?

25 Mar: Is It Legal to Buy Prescription Drugs from Canada?

  Many Americans save money by getting their prescription drugs from Canada, whose government regulates prices. Initially, many people who bought their prescriptions from Canada took organized bus trips to the country for the purpose. Nowadays, more people order their medicine from safe and licensed Canadian pharmacies. There’s no question that Americans save a lot of money by ordering their medicines from Canadian pharmacies. In some cases, drugs from Canada cost as little as one-fifth the price found inside America. However, some wonder if this might be too good to be legal. So is it really legal to buy prescription drugs from Canada? The answer isn’t so simple, but the activity is tolerated. Below is more information on the subject….

Helpful Ways of How to Take Pills If You Can’t Swallow Them

04 Mar: Helpful Ways of How to Take Pills If You Can’t Swallow Them

A lot of us have to take pills from time to time. For some, swallowing pills are easy, but many people have a tough time. No matter your age, if you have a hard time doing this, here are some helpful ways of how to take pills if you can’t swallow them. Crushing Pills Before crushing any pills, make sure to check with a pharmacist if it’s okay to do so. It’s usually fine to do this with most pills, but it’s very important to know if it’s safe first. Purchase a pill crusher. These were designed as a way of how to take to pills if you can’t swallow them. They can be found in most pharmacies and drug…

How to Check Prescription Drug Interactions

28 Feb: How to Check Prescription Drug Interactions

  When taking any type of medication, it is important to pay careful attention to its potential for drug interactions. Today, many people take a combination of prescription and over-the-counter medications to treat a variety of illnesses. While these medications are helpful for treating many different symptoms, it is essential to stay on guard for potential problems such as an allergic reaction or dangerous drug interaction that can lead to life-threatening symptoms in the patients who take the wrong medications together. Here, are the best tips for those who need to know how to check prescription drug interactions. Gather All Medications The first step to knowing how to check prescription drug interactions is to gather all of the medications that…

Is It Illegal to Buy Medicine from Canada?

27 Feb: Is It Illegal to Buy Medicine from Canada?

Trying to save on the costs of prescription medicines is a challenge that many people face. Buying medicines from Canada is a way to save money, but is it illegal to buy medicine from Canada? The savings can equal hundreds of dollars for Americans when buying from licensed, online pharmacies in Canada if you do a little research before making your purchase. What to Know The official answer to whether or not it is legal to buy Canadian medications through an online pharmacy and have them shipped into the United States is no, it isn’t legal. The reality is that most enforcement agencies are willing to allow American citizen to order several months worth of medications as long as the…

19 Feb: Top 10 Guidelines for Safe Use of Prescription Drugs

Every time an individual consumes drugs, foods, fluids or other substances, they have to be broken down by the body before they can be absorbed into the system. Waste products produced from the consumption are assimilated and cleared from the body through various organs such as the kidney and liver. When doctors prescribe medicine, patients should be very careful with the use of the drugs. They should make sure they fully understand how to use the drugs, their effectiveness and side effects. People should avoid medication errors because improper use of prescription medication can have harmful side effects. Guidelines for Safe Use of Prescription Drugs Misunderstandings and miscommunication between patients and their doctors or pharmacists cause many medication errors. Other…

What is the Difference Between Effexor and Cymbalta?

20 Jul: Effexor vs Cymbalta: Which Is Really Better for You?

More people everyday are prescribed serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors aka SNRIs, which are a class of antidepressant used to treat depression. There are four main SNRIs: enlafaxine (Effexor XR), duloxetine (Cymbalta), milnacipran (Savella), and desvenlafaxine (Pristiq). Today we are going to focus on two of the most commonly used of the four. Lets take a look at some of the similarities and differences between the two drugs, so that you can make a more informed decision when choosing between the two. Effexor is the first and most commonly used SNRI while Cymbalta was most recently released on the market. It was approved by the FDA in August of 2004. What Disorders Do SNRIs Treat? Both drugs work by preventing serotonin and noradrenaline…

06 Jul: Yaz vs Yasmin: Which is Right For You?

  Yaz and Yasmin are both very popular and highly effective birth control programs. While they share many similarities, they also have some differences to take into account before choosing one over the other. Both Yaz and Yasmin prevent pregnancy with an effectiveness rate of more than 99 percent and are the only birth control pills on the market to use drospirenone. They are both combination pills that use a combination of the hormones drospirenone and ethinyl estradiol. They operate on a monophasic cycle which means the active pills all contain the same dose of hormones and the inactive pills are taken to simply keep you remembering to stay on your program. One difference between Yaz and Yasmin is in…

11 May: How to Lessen the Effects of Acid Reflux Through Diet

Acid reflux has bothered almost everyone at one time or another, and certain foods can aggravate and intensify acid reflux symptoms. Sometimes, a change in diet is all that is necessary to remedy acid reflux. Lets take a look at some of the foods that you may need to avoid in order to better control your heartburn. Meat Ground beef, chuck Marbled sirloin Chicken nuggets Buffalo wings Vegetables French fries Onion, raw Fruit Orange juice Lemon Lemonade Grapefruit juice Cranberry juice Tomato Dairy Sour cream Milk shake Ice cream Cottage cheese, regular Grains Macaroni and cheese Spaghetti with sauce Beverages Liquor Wine Coffee, decaffeinated or regular Tea, decaffeinated or regular Fats / Oils Salad dressing, creamy Salad dressing, oil &…

01 Feb: Mixing herbal supplements and heart medications may be dangerous

According to a report from Reuters, taking ginkgo biloba, St. John’s wort and several other widely used herbal medications may impede the potency of prescription drugs, making them more or less effective. Experts at the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that mixing herbs and drugs also may cause serious heart rhythm problems and bleeding. “We can see the effect of some of these herb-drug interactions — some of which can be life-threatening — on tests for blood clotting, liver enzymes and, with some medications, on electrocardiogram,” Dr. Arshad Jahangir of the Mayo Clinic in Arizona said in a telephone interview. Many patients fail to disclose their use of herbal remedies so healthcare providers should be more probing,…

09 Dec: Splitting pills: Dos and don’ts

We’ve long advocated pill-splitting as a great way to save money on prescription drugs — but the caveat is that it only works with some pills. Pharmacist Richard Harkness offers a list of pills that can be safely split, as well as a list of those to avoid splitting, in Prevention Magazine. Keep in mind that this list is far from comprehensive — and always be sure to check with your doctor or pharmacist before splitting pills. Do Split atorvastatin (Lipitor) metformin (Glucophage) rosuvastatin (Crestor) citalopram (Celexa) nefazodone (Serzone) sertraline (Zoloft) clonazepam (Klonopin) olanzapine (Zyprexa) sildenafil (Viagra) finasteride (Proscar) paroxetine (Paxil) simvastatin (Zocor) lisinopril (Zestril) pravastatin (Pravachol) tadalafil (Cialis) lovastatin (Mevacor) quinapril (Accupril) vardenafil (Levitra) Don’t Split Tablets that break…

01 Dec: 72 million U.S. prescriptions per year are not FDA-Approved.

An Associated Press analysis last week concluded that millions of Americans are being prescribed drugs — including those covered under Medicaid — that have never been reviewed by the FDA for safety and effectiveness. The FDA admits there may be thousands of such drugs on the market. Reports the AP: “At a time when families, businesses and government are struggling with health care costs and 46 million people are uninsured, payments for questionable medications amount to an unplugged leak in the system … But the FDA estimates they account for 2 percent of all prescriptions filled by U.S. pharmacies, about 72 million scripts a year.” This isn’t a new problem — most of the drugs in question have been on…

10 Nov: The hidden costs of forgetting to take your meds

We’ve written a lot here about the dangers of taking drugs without a prescription, of doctor shopping, of accidental overdoses and unanticipated drug interactions, and of forgoing needed medications to save money. But one thing we haven’t written about is medication non-adherence — the problem of people simply forgetting to take their meds. It’s a more widespread, and serious, issue than you might have imagined. According to Intelecare, one out of every two patients fails to follow physician instructions. When patients are asked why, 84 percent cite forgetfulness as the main reason for their non-adherence. And check out these numbers: 1 out of 8 heart attack patients stops taking life-saving drugs after just 1 month 31 percent of all prescriptions…

20 Oct: A list of dangerous drugs — and safer alternatives — for seniors

Consumer Reports has published a valuable article identifying common prescription drugs that can be dangerous for older patients. Healthcare consumers over age 65 are more than twice as likely to suffer from adverse drug reactions; the publication lists the following drugs as posing a high enough risk that they should be avoided if possible: Antianxiety drugs Chlordiazepoxide (Librium, Limbitrol); diazepam (Valium); quazepam (Doral) Recommended alternatives: alprazolam (Xanax), lorazepam (Ativan), and oxazepam (Serax) Antidepressants Amitriptyline, doxepin (Sinequan) and Fluoxetine (Prozac) Recommended alternatives: citalopram (Celexa), paroxetine (Paxil), and sertraline (Zoloft) Antihistamines Chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton); diphenhydramine (Benadryl) Recommended alternatives: Cetirizine (Zyrtec); fexofenadine (Allegra); loratadine (Claritin) High blood pressure and enlarged prostate drugs Doxazosin (Cardura); prazosin (Minipress); terazosin (Hytrin) Recommended alternatives: Diuretics for high blood…

prescription drug safety

15 Oct: 10 Tips for Safer Prescription Drug Use

  Tens of thousands of Americans die every year from adverse prescription drug reactions — sometimes from an overdose, other times from an unexpected side effect, and often from taking the wrong combination of drugs. We have written before about the promise of Web sites like PharmaSurveyor and DoubleCheckMD, which help people to check the safety of their drug regimens. But making sure you are taking your drugs safely starts with having a proactive relationship with your doctor. I came across a list of “rules” for safer prescription drug use by the non-profit consumer group Public Citizen, and found some useful ideas in it. I’ve summarized the tips in excerpts below. Go here for the full post. 1. Have “Brown…

03 Sep: 10 tips for saving money on prescription drugs

eDrugSearch.com will soon be releasing our first e-book, 99 Ways to Save Money on Prescription Drugs. To whet your appetite, here are 10 ways to save, courtesy of the Cleveland Plain Dealer (who interviewed Dr. Edward Jardini and Steven Findlay, managing editor of Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs, for their story): 1. Start with a heart-to-heart with your doctor Tell him or her, honestly, how much you can afford to spend on medication … In the end, you may find you just don’t need some of the drugs you’re taking. 2. Ask about generics. These are usually much, much cheaper than brand-name drugs, says Steven Findlay … The cholesterol-lowering drug Lipitor, he says, is a good example. It costs $95…

19 Aug: Study: Don’t wash down your meds with OJ

A new study examining the impact of fruit juice consumption on the efficacy of prescription drugs reveals that some drugs — including heart and cancer drugs, antibiotics and hayfever medications — can lose virtually all of their benefit if they are washed down by juice. Reports the London Daily Mail: “Orange, apple and grapefruit juice can … stop drugs from entering the bloodstream and getting to work in the body — possibly rendering them useless … The potential effects are so serious, researchers warned, that if in doubt, patients should swap fruit juices for water when on medication.” A wide variety of drugs were affected by fruit juice consumption: Drugs shown to be weakened … include the blood pressure-lowering beta…

31 Jul: Four ways to keep your teen from abusing prescription medications

  The Indianapolis Star has a valuable article providing tips to parents who are worried about their teenage children abusing prescription medications. The article’s four tips: Monitor the prescriptions you have in your home. Secure your medicines. Dispose of old prescriptions. Communicate and set a good example for your child. It’s nice to see a reasonable — and actually useful — article on this issue, rather than the hysterical attacks on licensed Canadian pharmacies that this topic often inspires. Read the full article here. Also, check out Not in My House, a Web site from the Partnership for a Drug-Free America.

18 Jul: How to reduce medication errors

A Purdue University expert reports that more than 1.5 million Americans a year experience preventable drug-induced injuries. Many of these medication mistakes are caused by adverse drug reactions when a patient is given the wrong combination of drugs. Watch this informative video from Craig Svensson, dean of Purdue’s College of Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences, explaining why medication errors are so common and offering solutions on how to reduce medication errors.

16 Jul: Wal-Mart pharmacist’s error sends teen into coma

  No matter how much we try to protect ourselves from unsafe drugs and pharmacy practices, errors can and do occur. The Consumerist reports that a Utah teen was in ICU for 16 days after a Wal-Mart pharmacist gave him the wrong prescription for his strep throat. Jessie Scott’s doctor had ordered a liquid solution of oxycodone hydrochloride to treat Scott’s pain — but the pharmacist gave him a concentrated solution, which caused Scott to consume 20 times the prescribed dose of the medication. Ultimately, we have to trust our pharmacists — online or off — to do what they’ve been trained to do. But I would add that in my experience, when a liquid medication is concentrated — as…

29 Jun: Woman arrested for filling 200 fake prescriptions

  With all the talk of the dangers of online and mail-order pharmacies in the media these days, it’s important to remind ourselves that when people are determined to do the wrong thing, they’ll do it with or without the Internet’s help. I came across a great example of this in the news the other day, where in Prichard, Alabama, police arrested a man and woman for running a drug ring selling prescription drugs illegally. How did the woman — Angela Hurst, 28 — build her supply? By ordering them from a rogue pharmacy online? Nope. Here’s the story (italics mine): Narcotics officers say Hurst called in at least 200 hundred fake prescriptions to area drug stores. Hurst was allowed…

acid reflux drugs

12 Jun: Is the alphabet soup of acid reflux giving you heartburn of the brain?

  You’ve got persistent heartburn happening two or more days a week — something generally diagnosed as acid reflux disease these days. Which of the many available drugs should you take: Protonix Zegerid Nexium Prilosec Prevacid Or something else? Sounds confusing, doesn’t it? It isn’t, really. These drugs all do the same thing in basically the same way. And I hate to say it, but a big reason there are so many variations on the market has less to do with helping you than with lining the pockets of big pharmaceutical companies. You see, two of the best-selling acid reflux drugs — Prilosec and Nexium — are essentially the same drug marketed by the same company, AstraZeneca. Nexium is derived…

12 Jun: If pills haven’t fixed your ED, it is time to consider alternatives

Millions of dollars in direct-to-consumer advertising by big pharmaceutical companies have ensured that most Americans are familiar with the “Little Blue Pill” — Viagra — as well as with competing products Cialis and Levitra. These drugs, called phosphodiesterase inhibitors, enhance the effects of nitric oxide, a chemical that relaxes muscles in the penis. This increases blood flow to enable an erection to occur with proper stimulation. There are differences among the three medications, but they are relatively minor. Viagra came on the scene first, so it’s helped more people and has a longer track record. Levitra begins working the fastest, and Cialis lasts the longest — up to 36 hours, compared to four for Viagra. Often, a doctor might prescribe…

05 Jun: eDrugSearch.com featured on The Morning Show with Mike and Juliet

If you read this blog regularly, you know that eDrugSearch.com is an impassioned advocate for licensed Canadian pharmacies — and the American citizens who choose to use them. We work hard to educate consumers on how to stay safe when ordering medications over the Internet. In fact, it’s why we created this site in the first place. This past Monday, we were invited to be part of a panel on the topic of online pharmacy safety on The Morning Show with Mike and Juliet, a nationally syndicated TV program. Scott Baradell spoke on our company’s behalf. Here’s a video excerpt:

27 May: Lipitor: 50 million prescriptions can’t be wrong, right?

Lipitor was the most frequently prescribed brand-name drug in the United States last year, with 50 million prescriptions being filled. Vytorin was right up there, with 20 million. Add in all the other statins and you’re up to an amazing 150 million. As you might expect, we’ve had a fair amount of discussion in the eDrugSearch.com Community about statin drugs, which are used for the treatment of high cholesterol. People are most interested in understanding and comparing the benefits of Lipitor, Zocor and Crestor. Zocor is currently available in generic form in the U.S., but the other two drugs are not. Vytorin, of course, is on the outs these days after research showed in January that this combination drug (essentially…

22 May: Don’t blame the Internet for prescription drug abuse

Yeah, I know; I’ve written about this topic before — more than a few times. But I feel compelled to do so again. Frankly, I’m mad as heck and I can’t take it any more. Just as there have been past hysterias blaming the Internet for sexual predators, pornography, political polarization, celebrity obsession, obesity (go outside and play!) and every other social malady facing our nation, now it seems the media is whipping itself into a frenzy over the dangers of Internet pharmacies for prescription drug abuse. The latest blog post I flagged on this topic, “Internet Pharmacy Websites the New Drug Dealers,” referenced a sad tale on CNN.com headlined, “My husband died from online drugs.” Don’t get me wrong….

21 May: Adderall is for ADHD (wink, wink)

I had not seen the Wired magazine article on “super-charging your brain” with the chart labeled “Do the Right Drugs” until I read about it in the New York Times. I’m still a little blown away by what I read. The chart lays out the pros and cons of eight drugs that it says can “boost your cognitive output.” Included on the list is Adderall, the drug for ADHD that is being widely abused by young people these days. So, what does Wired have to say about Adderall? Thought to optimize levels of dopamine and norepinephrine, enhancing concentration and turning mundane tasks into wondrous ones. Often prescribed to ADHD patients (wink, wink). Adderall has been called “college crack” — the…

20 May: Reclast’s “jaw problems” caused by too many warnings.

Retired physician John R. Agnew has an amusing take on Big Pharma’s bombardment of consumers with DTC advertising. Writes Agnew: The drug commercials seem to me to be insulting. They overstate the benefits, minimize the side effects and ignore the cost: “Panacea is not for everyone,” they warn. “Let your doctor know if you have liver disease (he is too dumb to figure it out for himself) or are allergic to this drug (which you wouldn’t know in advance anyway). Side effects include fainting, jaundice, suicidal thoughts, constipation and sudden death. Do not operate heavy machinery after taking the first dose, and tell your doctor right away if you are dying”… My favorite is Reclast, a once-a-year treatment for osteoporosis….

20 May: The latest verdict against Accutane

Last month, a New Jersey jury awarded a Utah woman named Kamie Kendall $10.5 million for damage done by the acne drug Accutane, one of a series of recent successful lawsuits against the drug’s maker, Hoffman-LaRoche, Inc. The court found that Hoffman-LaRoche did not adequately warn consumers of the drug’s risks and side effects. A lawyer on the winning side states: It’s a very dangerous drug – it causes birth defects, it causes psychosis, it causes IBD. When you’ve got a drug like this you shouldn’t mince words at all, which is at the heart of the case. No question that’s been our point, and in three cases, we’ve won $2.5 million, then just over $7 million, then now almost…

28 Apr: eDrugSearch.com: crunching the numbers

From the press release we distributed this morning: eDrugSearch.com, the Health 2.0 social network and comparison shopping site for prescription drug consumers, announced today that it has generated more than $2.1 million in sales for member pharmacies through 875,000 visitor referrals from its comparison shopping engine. This includes an estimated $435,000 in March, based on 175,000 referrals to member sites. “eDrugSearch.com has established itself as one of the Web’s fastest-growing vertical search engines and comparison shopping sites since our launch last year,” said Cary Byrd, president and founder of eDrugSearch.com. “Our visitors know they can trust the quality and service of the pharmacies in our database — and trust us to deliver lower prices on prescription medications than they can…

08 Mar: eDrugSearch Community has strong feelings about pharma lawsuits

We’re pleased to say that Tom Lamb at Drug Injury Watch is a member of the eDrugSearch.com Community. He wasted no time after joining in stirring up a little controversy, posing the following question: Do you think that this “federal preemption” of drug injury cases is a good idea or bad policy? Among the responses of community members (which you can see in their entirety here): It would be horrible policy, because as we all know, the FDA no longer has teeth and is basically run by the pharmaceutical industry. If you then say the pharma companies can’t be sued because of FDA approval, you turn the system into a sick (pardon the pun) joke… If these drugs are unsafe…

27 Feb: eDrugSearch is a network for consumers who buy prescription drugs online

Since our founding a little over a year ago, eDrugSearch.com has prided itself on being a trusted search engine for U.S. consumers seeking medications from international pharmacies. We’ve gotten some nice attention for this achievement and have attracted a loyal base of users. Now, we’re ready to become something more — specifically, the leading social network for prescription drug consumers. Why a social network for online drug buyers? Prescription drug consumers have shown significant interest in social networks on general health sites, indicating — we think — an unmet demand for a niche community. Drug consumers relish the opportunity to share their experiences with one another. These individuals are increasingly turning to each other, and other data points on the…

06 Feb: How prescription medications killed Heath Ledger. Possible prevention?

The report from the medical examiner is in: Heath Ledger died from the “the combined effects of oxycodone, hydrocodone, diazepam, temazepam, alprazolam and doxylamine.” The brand names for the drugs that were in Ledger’s system are OxyContin, Valium, Xanax, Restoril, Unisom and Hydrocodone. To be clear, Ledger didn’t die from an overdose of prescription drugs. He died from Adverse Drug Effects (ADEs) — a fatal reaction to the combination of medications he was taking. As Dr. Kevin Pho of Kevin, M.D. surmises: “Two narcotics, three benzodiazepines, and one sedating antihistamine. If a single physician was responsible for these prescriptions, that’s a serious error in judgment. It is more likely that Mr. Ledger received multiple prescriptions from different physicians around the…

Celebrity Drug Overdoses

23 Jan: 12 Accidental Celebrity Prescription Drug Deaths

  Heath Ledger could be the latest star to have died from an accidental overdose of prescription drugs. Ledger was taking anti-depressants as well as the “dangerous drug” Ambien at the time of his death, although his autopsy today was inconclusive. While most celebrity overdoses have been the result of either suicide or the use of illegal drugs, a surprising number of stars have died by accident — from medications you can purchase at the corner pharmacy. Here’s a list of accidental celebrity drug deaths: 1.) MARILYN MONROE. Elton John’s “Candle in the Wind” died from an overdose of sleeping pills — specifically, Nembutal and chloral hydrate . Although Monroe’s death was officially listed as a suicide in 1962, many forensic…