diabetes

metformin tablets

26 Oct: Can’t Afford Your Metformin Tablets? Learn How to Save Money on Your Diabetic Prescriptions Right Now!

Prescription drugs—what would modern society do without them? Many of them cost a fortune, yet much of today’s society completely rely on them. Metformin tablets are a prime example of one of these vital drugs. Metformin is used by those suffering from Type 2 Diabetes and is used to control blood sugar levels. This medication is vital in improving quality of life for those suffering from this disease. Whether it’s a lack of full medical insurance or prescription coverage, much of society is forced to front the cost of prescription drugs. Metformin tablets is just one of these. In this blog, learn how to save big on your drug prescription costs! Metformin Tablets at Your Fingertips With eDrugSearch, you no…

How-Long-is-an-Open-Vial-of-Insulin-Good-For

28 May: How Long is an Open Vial of Insulin Good For?

Once an insulin vial is punctured and open there is a limited amount of time that the vial can be stored before it becomes unsafe to use. Many people who use insulin will have left over medication in the vial because of the size of their daily dosages. Different insulin products have different time limits on being able to store it safely and it can be hard to track and remember. Not all types of glucose will have the same expiration time on open vials. They not only vary by type but also by the drug used. Here’s a help list to refer to for the proper length of time to store open (punctured) vials: Long-Acting Insulin Levemir: 42 days…

20 Jul: Older diabetes drugs are cheaper, effective and have fewer side effects

It appears someone finally decided to take a look at the effectiveness and benefits of older diabetes drugs (such as metformin) compared with newer, more expensive ones (such as Avandia). Dr. Shari Bolen of Johns Hopkins University studied various medical databases and found 216 relevant studies and two systematic reviews. According to Reuters: Older drugs controlled blood sugar levels about as well as the thiazolidinediones [Avandia] did. There were some differences, however, in other effects. Thiazolidinediones were the only drugs that increased HDL “good” cholesterol levels, but they also increased LDL “bad” cholesterol levels. Metformin reduced LDL cholesterol levels, while the other agents appeared to have no effect on cholesterol levels. With the exception of metformin, the drugs generally increased…