big pharma

Insidious Greed: How Big Pharma Rips You Off on Drugs

21 Oct: Insidious Greed: How Big Pharma Rips You Off on Drugs

  Recently, through the launch of a new online database last week the U.S. government revealed that in 2013, doctors were paid roughly $380 million by medical device and pharmaceutical corporations for speeches and consultations, all within a five-month time frame. Big Pharma spends almost $20 billion annually marketing their products to doctors, which yields profits upwards of $300 billion per year in drug sales. A handful of these doctors were paid more than $500,000 apiece. Others were paid millions for the drugs and devices they helped to create. Doctors insist that this money doesn’t influence what they recommend to their patients. However, it’s extremely difficult to imagine what purpose the payments would serve if not to increase product sales through prescriptions. eDrugSearch.com…

The Financial Toxicity of Cancer Treatment

07 Oct: The Financial Toxicity of Cancer Treatment

  The past Sunday, 60 Minutes aired a segment “The Cost of Cancer Drugs” in which Leslie Stahl got down to the core of the high drug prices and the financial toxicity of cancer treatment. The focus was on drugs used in the treatment of cancer and how they are getting more and more expensive each time a new drug is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and released for use by the public. This isn’t the first time the high prices of these cancer drugs have been brought up as an important issue. There are a number of medical experts and doctors from around the globe who have been vocal about their concerns of the high costs…

Generic Prices Are Going Up

05 Aug: Generic Prices Are Going Up . . . Say It Ain’t So!

  Generic medications have long been known to be the cheaper alternative for those people struggling with the cost of medication. Generic medications have come about with the expiration of brand name patents, allowing many drug companies to produce generic medications that are every bit as effective as their brand name counterparts at a fraction of the cost. However, the tides are turning and some generic medications are becoming more and more expensive, making the once affordable alternatives out of reach for some people who simply cannot afford the cost. Cause of Generic Prices Going Up Supply and demand most certainly plays a role in the increase in generic drug prices, with those medications that are in high demand winning…

Canadian Pharmacies - Setting the Record Strait About Safety

11 Jul: Canadian Pharmacies — Setting the Record Strait About Safety

Millions of Americans turn to international sources for foreign medication, Canadian pharmacies in particular ranking high on the list. They’re close to home, extremely competitive in pricing when it comes to foreign drugs, and have strict safety regulations. However, the federal government for the United States uses plenty of scare tactics in an attempt to make American citizens steer clear of foreign drugs, even going so far as making it illegal to buy drugs from international sources. Because they do not have the official stamp of approval from the Food and Drug Administration, the door is officially closed for consumers in America. However, anyone with savvy and a pinched budget is likely to opt for Canadian pharmacies. The price of…

New Report: Obamacare Silver Plan May Have Higher Costs Than Traditional Plans

27 May: Obamacare Silver Plan May Have Higher Costs Than Traditional Plans

  According to a new report, the cost of prescription medications may be higher under the Affordable Care Act. Individuals expected to be affected the most will be patients who have the Obamacare Silver Plan and may be required to pay more than twice as much out of pocket for their prescription drugs. Those under the Obamacare Silver Plan and who have high insurance deductibles already need to pay 100 percent of their care costs out-of-pocket until they reach their deductible amount. This amount can be as much as $2,000 in some cases, and the overall expense will surpass that of some traditional health insurance plans offered by employers. The new health insurance set-up under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is not completely negative. One…

05 May: Has Big Pharma Really Taken Over Medical Research?

The creators of the new “Bought” movie are on a mission to answer the question once and for all — pulling the curtain back on Big Pharma’s insidious greed machine. “There is a story roaming through my head, one that’s insisting to get out. It was born in over 100 interviews with genuine, loving, caring health care professionals, researchers and advocates last year. We kept picking up a theme, a sense that the game was rigged, that we’d already played and lost but didn’t know it. Our health has already been Bought. It’s a risky story to tell, but would be a tragedy to passively consent to with silence.” The movie trailer begins at the 1:03 mark.

The Shocking Truth Why Prescription Drug Prices Are So High

22 Jul: The Shocking Truth Why Prescription Drug Prices Are So High

It’s no secret that prescription drug prices are at an all-time high. Americans are spending just under $1,000 each year for prescription drugs. Listed below are the top five real reasons why these drugs cost Americans so much. You’re paying for all of the drugs in America. You’re paying for all of the drugs in the world. You’re paying for expensive marketing and advertising campaigns. You’re paying for somebody’s fat corporate bonus. You’re paying taxes on it too! 1.) You’re paying for all of the drugs in America. Unfortunately, it’s impossible to just pay for one prescription. The cost of prescription drugs falls on everybody’s shoulders. Drug development is a vast and wide-reaching business. Drug prices cover research and development…

08 Feb: Big Pharma making big cuts in R&D

According to reports, the axe is coming down all over the pharma world on research and development projects that are not yielding immediate results. AstraZeneca (Atacand, Crestor), GlaxoSmithKline (Advair, Boniva) and Pfizer (Benadryl, Lipitor) have all already begun to scrap projects, while others like Sanofi-Aventis (Allegra, Plavix) are about to pick up the trend and start making cuts. The cuts come as no surprise, as big pharma companies have been seeing there pipelines shrink since 1998, when the trend to buy out drug rights from smaller bio-tech companies began. Despite the increased cost efficiency of buying drugs from smaller bio-techs, I am not so sure that big pharma is going to like the end result of their decision. Stephen Foley…

02 Nov: Healthcare amendment would delay access to “generic” versions of drugs

Healthcare reform isn’t just about the public option and paying for doctor’s visits — it’s also about equal, affordable access to life-saving medications for all Americans. That’s why many Big Pharma watchdogs are so disappointed with a recent amendment slipped into healthcare legislation that proposes extending patent protection on biologic drugs, delaying for years the public’s access to affordable follow-on versions. What are biologics? They’re the next big wave in medicine — drugs made not from simple chemical formulations, but from biological components. They’re very expensive, and poised for enormous success: By 2014, the biggest-selling meds will be biologics, according to an analysis from Evaluate Pharma. Taking the place of Pfizer’s gargantuan drug Lipitor will be Roche’s Avastin, a cancer…

02 Sep: Get your Pfizer Pfelon commemorative tee shirt here!

Pfizer, the world’s largest drug maker, will pay a record $2.3bn civil and criminal penalty over unlawful prescription drug promotions, the US Justice Department announced today. The department said the $2.3bn settlement included a $1.2bn criminal fine, the largest criminal fine in US history. The agreement also included a criminal forfeiture of $105m. Hat Tip to our friend Jack at PharmaGossip 🙂

18 Aug: About that $80 billion Big Pharma promised for healthcare reform

The pharmaceutical industry, through its lobbying group PhRMA, has promised to cut drug prices for certain Medicare Part D recipients and others by $80 billion over the next decade. In return, the Obama Administration has promised not to reform the pharmaceutical industry — no new regulations, no Medicare negotiation for lower drug prices, no drug reimportation from Canada. Sound like a good deal to you? Well, $80 billion sure sounds like a lot of money. But here are some things to think about — President Obama trumpeted the deal without indicating how or whether these savings could be guaranteed; the specific terms are not included in any of the bills in Congress. Some analysts estimate that only $30 billion of…

24 Jun: It’s not a “free market” — Big Pharma has bought and paid for it

Can I make a suggestion to you? When some political blowhard on TV or the radio tells you something, don’t automatically believe it. Do your research to learn the facts for yourself, OK? You see, pundits and politicians lie. And they hope you’ll be so accepting of their carefully crafted talking points that you won’t bother to investigate an issue for yourself. A great example is high drug prices. America has — by far — the highest prescription drug prices in the world. But the pharmaceutical industry, aided by various demagogic pundits and alleged “think tanks,” has done a masterful job of convincing a sizable minority of Americans that these high prices are not the pharmaceutical industry’s fault, or our…

29 Apr: Healthcare, prescription drugs, and the plight of the self-employed

I recently came across a remarkable blog rant by a man named Jim Thornton, a competitive swimmer at age 56. Under a list of his latest swimming times, he shared the story of some of the struggles he’d recently been having with healthcare and prescription drug costs. An excerpt: Our health insurance went up to $1711.50 a month for a plan that requires each member of the family to spend $1400 a year before complete coverage kicks in. For a variety of complicated reasons, we cannot alter any of the terms of the policy. It is a take it or leave it situation. If we leave it, my wife and I have been taking statin drugs and antidepressants and will…

28 Apr: Investment analyst: Obama’s reforms will barely make a dent in Big Pharma’s profits

We’ve heard endless whining by Big Pharma and its water carriers in Congress about how President Obama’s plans to reduce prescription drug costs will all but destroy the U.S. pharmaceutical industry. An investment analyst who covers the industry thinks otherwise. Jason Napodano, in a report for Zacks Investment Research published earlier this month, writes: When President Obama’s administration released the proposed budget for the upcoming fiscal year, drug stocks quickly dropped. Fears of socialized medicine, or “Hillary-Care 2.0” turned investors away from the sector. Was the drop warranted? … The net result of healthcare reform is likely to be limited on big pharmaceutical earnings … At this point, the fear of healthcare reform seems entirely more bark than bite. Napodano…

21 Apr: Big Pharma ignores down economy, raises prescription drug prices again

The AARP’s annual report on prescription drug prices, released last week, reveals that pharmaceutical manufacturers raised prices on the most popular brand-name drugs by 8.7 percent in 2008 — well over twice the rate of inflation. According to the AP: AARP’s report highlighted growing costs of what it said were the 219 most widely used brand-name drugs. Among the drugs that saw the biggest price increases in 2008, according to AARP: Prevacid, for acid reflux; Wellbutrin, for depression; and Lunesta, for sleeping. Prevacid went up by 30 percent, Wellbutrin by 21 percent and Lunesta by 20 percent. Financial analysts have attributed some of the increases to drug makers attempting to boost profits amid an economic downturn as they confront the…

28 Mar: Why is Big Pharma afraid of comparative effectiveness research?

President Obama’s economic stimulus plan includes funding for “comparative effectiveness research,” which would study various prescription drugs, along with medical treatments and devices, to determine which perform best for the least amount of money. As the Washington Post describes the program: What’s best for insomnia — Lunesta, at about $6 a pill, or Zolpidem, at $2? Should a man with prostate cancer choose radiation, surgery or “watchful waiting”? Is it better to operate on a bad knee or get an injection of the joint fluid known as Visco. To help doctors and patients decide, President Obama has dedicated $1.1 billion in the economic stimulus package for federal agencies to oversee studies on the merits of competing medical treatments. The approach,…

05 Mar: Wyeth v Levine Ruling Signals The Tide is Turning Against Big Pharma

For nearly three decades, it’s seemed like everything — at least when it comes to government decision-making — has gone Big Pharma’s way. For example: The U.S. government permitted Big Pharma to begin advertising directly to consumers, despite the fact that this practice is prohibited worldwide (except in New Zealand). The billions of dollars spent on advertising has led to a dramatic increase in prescription drug consumption — including by teens who steal drugs like Viagra out of the family medicine cabinet after hearing how cool they are, ad nauseum, in TV ads. The government slashed the FDA’s staff by a third during the Bush administration (after significant cuts in the Reagan administration) and allowed Big Pharma lobbyists to wield…

16 Feb: It’s time to end corporate welfare for prescription drug companies

I found this wonderful letter by Carrol L. Fry in the Kansas City Star and wanted to share it with all of you. It’s in response to a syndicated column by a typically out-of-touch Washington pundit. I read George Will’s hand-wringing column about the imminent demise of Medicare (2/7, Opinion, “Obama willing, Congress weak on entitlements”). Maybe if our government were willing to curb corporate welfare for the prescription drug companies, we could save a few billion. I was shocked to find that my Medicare Plan D cost for one of my prescriptions, for both my co-pay and Medicare, was $392 for a 90-day supply, and another was $265 for 90 days. I checked prices at a Canadian pharmacy and…

13 Feb: Senator Klobuchar: Let’s put an end to drug company price-gouging

  Amy Klobuchar, the freshman U.S. Senator from Minnesota, has penned an opinion piece on “sudden and dramatic” price increases in prescription drugs that she argues are not only wrong, but in many cases illegal. Here’s an excerpt from Klobuchar’s article: Two years ago, Jesse and Lisa Benson became the proud parents of twin girls, Anna and Sophia. However, Sophia was born with a rare heart condition called patent ductus arteriosis, known as PDA, a disorder that prevents holes from healing in the hearts of premature infants. At Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Sophia’s heart condition was treated successfully with intravenous indomethacin, a drug sold under the name Indocin IV. The drug has been around for several decades and…

03 Dec: Q&A with Dr. Peter Rost, eDrugSearch.com’s choice for FDA commissioner

It should come as no surprise to readers of this blog that we are delighted about the prospect of a new FDA commissioner in 2009 — one who we hope will put the interests of the people above those of large pharmaceutical companies. We have also been pleasantly surprised to see the groundswell of public support for Pfizer whistleblower Dr. Peter Rost for the FDA’s top job. A clear industry outsider like Dr. Rost might seem a longshot to ultimately win the job — but then again, Obama was a longshot to win the presidency. And there are these three hopeful signs: 1. Dr. Rost is blowing away the competition in the voting at John Mack’s influential Pharma Marketing Blog….

04 Nov: Wyeth v. Levine update

  From the Wall Street Journal Law Blog: After the arguments wrapped up in Wyeth v. Levine…we called around and spoke to a couple lawyers who were present at the scene. Based on those convos, and an AP report, we were able to cobble together an overview of the back-and-forthing… …the Justices took issue with Wyeth’s argument that it couldn’t update its label to add stronger warnings without first getting FDA approval. “Wyeth could have gone back to the FDA anytime” to update the label, said Justice Souter. “And it simply didn’t do it.” But Seth Waxman, who argued the case for Wyeth, argued … that, when the FDA has specifically considered the risk involved and rejected the sort of…

03 Nov: Wyeth v. Levine ruling could be major blow to healthcare consumers

People’s Pharmacy is an excellent syndicated column that you should definitely check out if you aren’t already reading it. If it’s not in your hometown paper, you can find them online here. The writers, Joe and Terry Graedon, have been impassioned advocates for healthcare consumers for more than 30 years. (Here’s what the Graedons have to say about Canadian pharmacies, by the way: “The FDA won’t admit it, but buying drugs from legitimate Canadian pharmacies may be safer than buying from the drugstore down the block.”} I bring up the Graedons because their column recently reminded me about a very important issue that had fallen off my radar screen. Today, the U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to begin hearing arguments…

10 Oct: ABC News: Beware of prescription savings clubs

There are a number of good, money-saving prescription drug card programs out there, which eDrugSearch.com will tell you about in our upcoming e-book. But there are also some scams out there — which ABC investigated in this report. An excerpt: More than 45 million Americans do not have prescription drug insurance. And some have turned to online prescription drug service companies that offer help getting prescription drugs inexpensively in exchange for a fee. Online companies promoting cheap prescription drugs may be misleading… Without insurance, Andrea [Melnick] was left to try and get pricey epilepsy medications, which cost up to $800 a month, on her own. Andrea looked for help online and found a company called Select Care Benefits Network. “It…

03 Oct: Sometimes it’s good to count our blessings

  I don’t believe any nation — even one as great as the United States — should ever rest on its laurels. For this reason, I shout from the rooftops about the changes that I believe we need to make as a country, particularly when it comes improving our healthcare system. I believe that is the duty of every citizen. If you read this blog regularly, you know my story. I am suspicious of the motives and actions of large pharmaceutical companies. I am concerned that our government is not doing enough to protect us from corporate influence that leads to unsafe drugs being OKed by the government, skyrocketing prices for brand-name medications, and a lack of competition among drug…

01 Oct: A hero to all of us — except Big Pharma

I think the best story I read on Monday’s $425 million Cephalon settlement was the law firm Phillips & Cohen’s press release: The government’s investigation into Cephalon Inc.’s illegal marketing practices that culminated in today’s $425,000,000 settlement and guilty plea by the pharmaceutical company began in January 2003 with a Cephalon sales representative in Ohio. The sales representative, Bruce Boise, refused to follow company-ordered sales strategies to convince doctors to prescribe Cephalon’s Actiq, Gabitril and Provigil drugs for unapproved (“off-label’) uses because he was worried the sales practices were illegal and the “off-label” uses were dangerous for patients. Boise was so concerned about Cephalon’s off-label marketing that he contacted the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to inform them of what…

29 Sep: Obama and McCain the Flying Wallendas of prescription drug flip-flops?

Can you hear that? It’s the sound of political spinning, twirling and flip-flopping — followed closely by backbones turning to mush. In the face of a relentless disinformation campaign (and lots of campaign donations) by the pharmaceutical industry and its front groups over the past several months, both Barack Obama and John McCain are showing strong signs of backing down — in unison — from their pledges to legalize Canadian drug reimportation if they are elected. Call them the Flying Wallendas of Flip-Flops. For guys who claim to be about change — with McCain having the nerve to boast that he “took on the drug industry” in his campaign ads — they are beginning to spew the same old song…

01 Sep: Big Pharma’s $3 billion on advertising is a waste of YOUR money

Americans are known for our short memories, so it may surprise you to know that prescription drug ads aimed at consumers are a relatively new phenomenon. They’ve only been around in present form for a little over a decade, when the FDA, under pressure from the pharmaceutical industry, approved the practice. Now, it’s hard to watch TV or pick up a magazine without seeing a drug commercial. You might also be unaware that the U.S. is one of only two countries in the world that permit this kind of advertising. The other is New Zealand. There are a number of reasons why most doctors and health experts think direct-to-consumer advertising is a bad idea. Here are a few: Prescription drugs…

25 Aug: Lies about the safety of Canadian drugs

Chris Rice at OpEdNews is boiling mad about corrupting lobbyists and duplicitous politicians who have made it difficult for U.S. residents to buy drugs from Canadian pharmacies. Here’s an excerpt from his column: LIE: The Bush administration is fighting importation of cheaper prescription drugs from Canada by claiming they are unsafe and thereby protecting pharmaceutical companies who have given over $74 billion (or $2,033 per hour) [in contributions] since 2000. FACT: HHS and FDA officials cannot identify a single American injured as a result drugs purchased from licensed Canadian pharmacies. One of the nation’s leading health experts stated the administration’s argument was “hogwash” since “drugs purchased through the Canadian health care system are every bit as safe as those available…

20 Aug: Survey: Teens who abuse prescription drugs don’t buy them online

The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University (CASA), last week issued a fascinating survey of teens. Two results stood out to me: 1. Teens (aged 12 to 17) indicated, for the first time, that it is easier to acquire “prescription drugs such as OxyContin, Percocet, Vicodin or Ritalin, without a prescription” than it is to buy beer. 2. While Internet pharmacies have been widely blamed for the increase in prescription drug abuse, few of the teens surveyed say that the drug abusers acquire their drugs from online pharmacies. That’s right. Here’s what CASA’s press release says: When teens who know prescription drug abusers were asked where those kids get their drugs: 31 percent said from friends…

07 Aug: Are suffix drugs a ripoff?

The Consumerist has been pulling plums from Dr. Edward Jardini’s How to Save on Prescription Drugs — and the latest has caused a bit of a firestorm on the blog. Specifically, the Consumerist says that “suffix drugs” — the kinds with letters like CD, CR, ER, LA, SR, XL, XR, or XT after the name — are usually just different versions of the same drug that vary only in how the drug releases in the body. The blog then says: By coming up with different variations on old drugs, pharmaceutical companies can keep the profits rolling on drugs whose patents have expired. Best of all, if they can get the doctor to write one of these letter sequences after the…

01 Aug: Natural career progression: from Hooters to pharma sales rep

I found it odd to stumble upon what is apparently a running column in the Lakeland (FL) Ledger called “Bartender Spotlight.” That’s right — it’s a series of profiles of local bartenders. I also found it interesting that the bartender the Ledger profiled on Thursday was 21-year-old Ashley Von Heal from “Hooters at 3400 US 98 North.” What I found highly predictable, however, is what Ashley wants to do for a living. Here’s the relevant excerpt: A marketing and sales major, she’d eventually like to become a pharma sales rep. Why pharmaceutical sales? “I can make pretty good money, plus I want to be able to travel while I’m still young.” Look, we’ll say it again — we have absolutely…

29 Jul: Follow eDrugSearch.com on Twitter

We’ve started a Twitter account and would love for you to follow us. If you’re not familiar with Twitter, it’s a social network built around a kind of mini-blogging or group IM tool that allows you to leave messages of up to 140 characters. Some of our favorite bloggers like John Mack, Jack Friday and Matthew Holt are already using it, so we thought we’d try it out, too. You can follow us here: https://twitter.com/carybyrd

28 Jul: Big Pharma dances on the FDA’s grave, part 2

I wrote the other day about the hypocrisy –not to mention true gall — that pharma apologists like Peter Pitts have shown in their attacks on licensed Canadian pharmacy drug reimportation. Essentially, Pitts argues that Americans should not be permitted to buy Canadian drugs because the FDA is incompetent to regulate these imports and keep the public safe. This is now the pharmaceutical industry’s leading argument against Canadian drugs. The exquisitely painful irony here, of course, is that Big Pharma has been leading the charge to de-fang (and then de-gum and de-tongue) the FDA for decades now. I like the analogy I used the other day, so I’ll use it again: It’s like a child murdering his parents — then…

28 Jul: Medicare Part D has been a great program for pharmaceutical companies

Jacob Goldstein at the Wall Street Journal Health Blog reported Friday: It was dueling reports yesterday on Capitol Hill, as Democrats argued that Medicare is paying way too much for prescription drugs and Republicans countered that the spending is on target. Henry Waxman, chairman of the House oversight committee and a longtime critic of the Medicare Part D drug benefit, … released [a] report, which looked at drug costs for so-called “dual eligible” patients whose drug coverage was switched from Medicaid to Medicare in 2006. The report found that Medicare Part D pays 30% more for drugs than Medicaid, a discrepancy worth more than $3.7 billion for drugmakers in 06 and 07. Not to be outdone, the Republicans on the…

23 Jul: Big Pharma steps up disinformation campaign against drug reimportation

You might think Big Pharma would give up its longstanding fight against Canadian pharmacy drug reimportation — now that both John McCain and Barack Obama vocally support it (not to mention 80 percent of the American public). You’d be wrong. As it turns out, Big Pharma believes it has a trump card in its bid to maintain its inflated drug profits by keeping out competition from abroad. That trump card: the incompetence of the FDA. The argument is outlined in this op-ed piece by Peter Pitts, president of the Center for Medicine in the Public Interest, which is funded by Big Pharma among other sources. Says Pitts: Several lawmakers have proposed allowing Americans to buy drugs from abroad. Since many…

06 Jul: Why pharmaceutical companies want marijuana legalized

I came across a really interesting piece on AlterNet, detailing the efforts of Big Pharma to develop and patent cannabis-based medicines. Apparently, pharmaceutical companies think medical marijuana delivered as patented pills, oral sprays and in other forms could be a real cash cow. They think this benefit would more than offset any loss of revenues from people turning to roll-your-own solutions. Here’s an excerpt from the story: Big Pharma is busily applying for — and has already received — multiple patents for the medical properties of pot … … as the private sector continues to move forward with research into the safety and efficacy of marijuana-based pharmaceuticals, it will become harder and harder for the government and law enforcement to…

02 Jul: Will we have to hit bottom before we reform our healthcare system?

Drug addicts talk about having to “hit bottom” before they finally realize they have to do something about their problem. Are we about to see the U.S. healthcare system hit bottom? Today, UnitedHealth Group, the nation’s largest health insurer, cut its earnings forecast and said it would slash 4,000 jobs. Bloomberg reports: In the Medicare business for the elderly, for which UnitedHealth is the market leader, gross margins declined in plans that provide prescription drugs and specialized coverage for people with chronic diseases, the company said. The company forecast that its overall medical loss ratio, the percentage of premium revenue spent on medical care, would increase to 82.5 percent for the full year, up from its earlier prediction of 81.3…

20 May: Audio of Glaxo CEO meltdown

GlaxoSmithKline CEO JP Garnier is grilled relentlessly by a BCC radio reporter about the suppression of data that suggested the anti-depressant Paxil (Seroxat in the U.K.) increased the likelihood of teen suicides — and finally walks out of the interview. Here’s the 10-minute clip; the meltdown starts at about the seven-minute mark: More on the interview from Furious Seasons. More on Garnier here.

20 May: The latest verdict against Accutane

Last month, a New Jersey jury awarded a Utah woman named Kamie Kendall $10.5 million for damage done by the acne drug Accutane, one of a series of recent successful lawsuits against the drug’s maker, Hoffman-LaRoche, Inc. The court found that Hoffman-LaRoche did not adequately warn consumers of the drug’s risks and side effects. A lawyer on the winning side states: It’s a very dangerous drug – it causes birth defects, it causes psychosis, it causes IBD. When you’ve got a drug like this you shouldn’t mince words at all, which is at the heart of the case. No question that’s been our point, and in three cases, we’ve won $2.5 million, then just over $7 million, then now almost…