Delicious Diabetes-Friendly Foods That Lower Blood Sugar Instantly

foods that lower blood sugar instantly

Are you looking fo foods that lower blood sugar instantly?

We all know that staying on any strict diet can be challenging at times.

It’s even more challenging when you have diabetes and you’re taking medication.

The main reason for this is the amazing variety of delicious foods which are often off-limits when you are dealing with a chronic disease.

Unfortunately, the foods that taste good are usually prepared in unhealthy ways, packed with different additives, condiments, and often sugar.

It’s not only desserts and sweets.

The majority of processed foods is bad for you, for one reason or another.

Going out and eating at a restaurant is a challenge on its own. You probably know this all too well.

All the guidelines advise you to prepare your food as often as you can.

This is logical, it puts you in control.

When you cook for yourself, you are familiar with all the ingredients.

The problem is that not all people are skilled in cooking nor have the knowledge about the full assortment of ingredients they can enjoy with diabetes.

This often causes the meals to be very basic and plain tasting. You might even say boring.

It does not have to be this way.

There are many delicious foods that you can enjoy with diabetes.

It does take some learning to get to know them all but the reward, in the end, is worth it.

There are even some very tasty foods that can help you to regulate blood sugar levels with more success.

These are not only sugar-free (carb-free) foods.

Some foods rich in complex carbs (starch and fiber) can help you to maintain a healthy weight and normal blood glucose levels while making you feel fuller and energized.

The best thing is, they also taste great.

Foods that can do this are the foods with a low glycemic index or GI.

In this article, you can find eight examples of such foods.

We made a selection of healthy, low GI, and delicious ingredients that you can combine when you are preparing a meal or a dessert for yourself.

If this is something that interests you, please, keep reading this article.

The Glycemic Index (GI)

When you eat carbs, they cause changes in your blood sugar levels.

This is inevitable.

However, not all carbs do this in the same way.

Plain sugars are the worse.

They can cause sudden and severe drops and spikes of blood glucose.

Luckily, plain sugars are not the only carbs.

There are more complex carbs, such as starch and fiber.

These are the good carbs with many health benefits.

Scientists use Glycemic index (GI) to rank the carbs according to their effect on blood glucose levels.

For example, sugars have a high GI (55 and higher), while complex carbs have a low GI (55 and lower).

Lower GI means better regulation of blood sugar.

This is why it is important to pay attention to the glycemic index of foods, especially if you have diabetes.

Now that we made this clear, let’s take a look at some delicious, low GI, food options for you.

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar Instantly

Sweet Potato

Sweet potatoes have a much lower glycemic index (GI) compared to regular potatoes.

Another interesting fact about sweet potatoes is their fiber content.

In most fruits and vegetables, more fiber can be found in the peel than in the flesh. With sweet potatoes it is different.

The flesh is richer in fiber.

All of this makes sweet potatoes a very good, and delicious, carb source for diabetics.

Some scientific studies research the role of sweet potatoes in the diet of people with type 2 diabetes.

The results show that sweet potatoes may have a role in blood sugar levels control.

Whether or not this is true, sweet potatoes are certainly a nutrient-rich food with low GI and a much better dietary option for diabetes patients than regular potatoes.

Cinnamon

This aromatic spice has been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years.

In modern times it is used as a condiment for various foods, such as breakfast cereal.

Cinnamon has a very positive effect on blood sugar levels control.

It acts on glucose (blood sugar) much in the same way as insulin does by boosting its transport into the cells.

This means that cinnamon could potentially be beneficial for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Cinnamon also increases insulin sensitivity almost immediately after consumption.

All of this makes cinnamon one of the best-tasting and most efficient anti-diabetes foods.

Berries

Most whole fruits have a low glycemic index (GI), with few exceptions.

However, fruits are full of simple sugars rather than complex carbs which are known to contribute to better glycemic control.

They are also rich in various nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, and fiber.

Still, some fruits are better than others.

Studies show that certain fruits can have an especially positive effect on diabetes.

These are mostly berries, such as blueberries and blackberries, as well as grapes.

Yogurt

Plain, unsweetened, yogurt is a very balanced combination of protein, fat, and carbs.

The low content of carbs makes the glycemic index of yogurt very low.

For some reason, plain yogurt, such as Greek-style yogurt, is the best dairy option for glycemic control.

An analysis of three independent studies, published in 2014, reports that plain yogurt can potentially lower the risk of diabetes.

Beans

Beans and other legumes, such as lentils, peas, and chickpeas are all very good sources of energy.

They are rich in protein and complex carbs, especially fiber.

Beans have a low glycemic index (GI).

This makes them a very good choice of carbs and energy because they do not cause sharp rises in blood sugar levels.

Beans also provide a longer feeling of fullness.

The energy they provide is released slowly and over time.

study published in 2012 concluded that a diet rich in legumes has a positive effect on blood sugar control in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Oats

With a low glycemic index (GI) oats have a positive effect on the control of blood glucose levels (glycemic control).

This means that if you eat oats you will not experience sharp drops or spikes of blood sugar.

You will also feel fuller for longer.

The best news is that oats can be combined with other healthy foods such as yogurt, nuts, and fruits to make a delicious treat.

It is important to state that you should eat oats in moderation because they are rich in carbs.

These are complex carbs, not simple sugars.

However, eating too many oats will eliminate their full benefits, such as improved insulin sensitivity and glycemic control.

Nuts

Many kinds of nuts are just swarming with nutrients of all types.

These include:

  • Proteins
  • Vitamins
  • Minerals
  • Flavonoids
  • Antioxidants
  • Unsaturated fatty acids

In addition to their nutritional value, nuts also taste very good.

They also have a low GI, especially if you eat them whole, unprocessed, and without any added flavors or coatings.

study published in 2014 shows the positive effect that the consummation of nuts has on diabetes.

Fish

All meats are low in carbs and therefore have a low GI.

However, fish seems to provide some other benefits when it comes to regulating blood sugar levels.

A scientific study that lasted for fifteen years and involved 4472 participants was published in 2009.

It concluded that regular consummation of lean types of fish might have a positive effect of prevention and control of type 2 diabetes.

Cod, haddock and pollock are all fish types that may help you to keep your blood glucose in check.

The Bottom Line

If you are a diabetic, you do need to take special care about what you eat. 

Sometimes it can seem that all the good-tasting stuff is off the menu.

However, healthy food does not have to lack flavor.

There are many tasty options out there.

Even better, some delicious foods can help you to keep your blood sugar under control and remain in good shape.

Expert References:

  1. Muraki I, Imamura F, Manson JE, Hu FB, Willett WC, van Dam RM, Sun Q. Fruit consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes: results from three prospective longitudinal cohort studies. BMJ. 2013 Aug 28;347:f5001. doi: 10.1136/bmj.f5001. Erratum in: BMJ. 2013;347:f6935. PubMed PMID: 23990623; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3978819.
  2. Hou Q, Li Y, Li L, Cheng G, Sun X, Li S, Tian H. The Metabolic Effects of Oats Intake in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Nutrients. 2015 Dec 10;7(12):10369-87. doi: 10.3390/nu7125536. PubMed PMID: 26690472; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4690088.
  3. Ashkan Afshin, Renata Micha, Shahab Khatibzadeh, Dariush Mozaffarian, Consumption of nuts and legumes and risk of incident ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 100, Issue 1, July 2014, Pages 278–288, https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.113.076901
  4. Ooi CP, Loke SC. Sweet potato for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Sep 3;2013(9): CD009128. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD009128.pub3. PubMed PMID: 24000051; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6486146.
  5. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/1384247
  6. van Woudenbergh GJ, van Ballegooijen AJ, Kuijsten A, Sijbrands EJ, van Rooij FJ, Geleijnse JM, Hofman A, Witteman JC, Feskens EJ. Eating fish and risk of type 2 diabetes: A population-based, prospective follow-up study. Diabetes Care. 2009 Nov;32(11):2021-6. doi: 10.2337/dc09-1042. Epub 2009 Aug 12. PubMed PMID: 19675200; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2768220.
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