Should you trust Wikipedia’s prescription drug information?

We assume that eDrugSearch.com users already take Wikipedia with a grain of salt, but just in case you needed some further convincing:

AttorneyatLaw.com reports that Wikipedia entries on prescription drugs “may exclude important information about life-threatening side effects and drug interactions,” according to researchers from Nova Southeastern University in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida.

As you know, we at eDrugSearch.com are all about healthcare consumers empowering themselves by learning about drugs online. We think our diseases and health conditions is an excellent source for this information, because it is comprised of data from sources like the FDA and, for breaking news updates, the Associated Press. In addition to our online pharmacy dictionary, there are a number of other good sources out there as well.

Unfortunately, Google is in love with Wikipedia — which means that when you search for many prescription drug names, the Wikipedia entry is one of the first selections that will pop up in your browser. Please, resist the urge to base any medical decisions on information on Wikipedia; use it only as a starting point for further research — both online and in consultation with your doctor or pharmacist.

About Cary Byrd

eDrugSearch founder, Cary Byrd, has been called an “e-health innovator” by MarketIntellNow, interviewed by top pharmaceutical industry journalists, invited to Matthew Holt’s Health 2.0 Conference and a Consumer Report's health summit, and highlighted on numerous health blogs.

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0 thoughts on “Should you trust Wikipedia’s prescription drug information?

  • As much as I love eDrugsearch.com, not even it should be our sole resource for prescription drug information. All information obtained online should be verifyed with a doctor or pharmacist. Wikipedia offers a lot of information on a lot of subjects, very little of which is written by a professional on the subject.

  • Wikipedia should not be taken as an authority on any subject that you research, especially health and medication articles. While I have found much of their information to be accurate, I have also seen glaring errors and a lot of information left out. Always verify with reputable sources.

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